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A William IV silver table snuff box, Indian pig
A turn of the century pair of German glass claret jugs.A set of seven continental silver and enamel spoons and
Birmingham, United Kingdom
DoneMon, Sep 16, 2013 9:00 AM UTC

Silver & Plated Ware

As autumn approaches, our September sale of Silver & Plated Ware promises a wide range of pieces from curious novelties to collectable items by celebrated silversmiths. Marked out for special attention firstly is a selection of lots consigned on behalf of the Gumboots Foundation, a charity aiming to address poverty and AIDS related issues in South Africa (Lots 157, 207, 244, 335, 366,488, 489, 563). The money raised through the sale of these lots will go towards improving education, nutrition, empowerment and well-being in South African communities and any interest will be greatly appreciated. We have several notable names featuring in this autumn sale, the first of whom is Christopher Dresser: Dresser's influential designs have featured on a number of occasions recently within the industry press. Lot 342, likely to be no exception, is a three piece tea service by Elkington & Co. designed by Christopher Dresser, the design appears in both Harry Lyons 'Christopher Dresser, The People`s Designer 1834-1904', and Michael Whiteway (Ed.) 'Christopher Dresser: A Design Revolution'. From one Prominent figure of the nineteenth century to another, we are proud to be offering a private collection of novelties by Sampson Mordan (Lots 583-607). The famed propelling pencil producers were also later known for their intricate and high quality novelties and this selection offers collectors a chance to purchase a discerning piece. Continuing the theme of distinguished names, Shakespeare himself is quoted on the engraving on Lot 337: 'More water glideth by the mill than wots the miller of' is from Titus Andronicus, often considered Shakespeare's bloodiest and darkest 'revenge play'. The quote is uttered in response to the revelation of a vicious revenge plot between the families of Titus Andronicus and the Emperor Saturinus, roughly translated it means 'Many things are done in a house which the master and mistress never dream of'.