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Besler Hand Colored Engraving

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Besler Hand Colored Engraving

Lot 0042 Details

Description
BESLER, Basilius (1561 – 1629). Plate 365. 1. Petasites – Petasites hybridus, Large purple butterbur, bog rhubarb, Devil’s hat, or pestilence wort (Asteraceae or daisy family). Grows throughout most of Europe. Its leaves have been used in traditional Austrian and Czech medicine internally (as tea or cold maceration in ethanol) and externally (as compresses or maceration in vinegar) for treatment of infections, fever, flu, colds, hay-fever and allergies. Preliminary trials have shown a preparation of Butterbur root to be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine attacks.
II.Aeconitum hyemale – Eranthis hyemalis, Winter aconite (Ranunculaceae or buttercup family). Native to woodland habitats in France, Italy, the Balkans, and widely naturalized elsewhere in Europe. Valued in cultivation as one of the earliest of all flowers to appear. ‘Hyemalis’ means winter-flowering in Latin, and ‘er’ + ‘anthos’ in Greek mean spring-flower. All parts of the plant are poisonous when consumed by humans and other mammals, because it contains cardiac glycosides (which stimulate the heart but may cause serious, often irreparable heart damage in large doses). Specific cardiac glycosides present in this species are also found in toad venom.
III.Petasites flore albo – Petasites albus, White butterbur (Asteraceae family). Grows in the mountains, sometimes at altitudes of more than 6,500 feet. First recorded in Sweden in 1737. The small fleshy petioles (leaf stems) are very palatable when cooked and eaten like asparagus. The root is emmenagogue, hypnotic, sedative and vulnerary. The ground or finely chopped rhizome has a healing effect when applied to slow-healing or weak ulcers, or to suppurating wounds. An infusion of the leaves is a specific remedy for coughs.
Copper engraving with hand coloring. Nuremberg: 1613 (1640; 1713).
The first large-folio natural history botanical and the earliest pictorial record of a specific garden, this great florilegium showcases over 1,000 varieties of flowers depicted in 367 engraved and colored plates. The garden of Eichstatt was the first comprehensive botanical garden in Germany devoted to flowering plants, and was founded in 1596. It consisted of eight separate gardens constructed at Willibaldsburg castle for Konrad, bishop-prince of Eichstatt. Each garden was devoted to flowers from a different country. Besler was a Nuremberg apothecary who was called upon for guidance on specimens for the gardens when its first director had died. Besler introduced the idea of documenting the vast garden and depicting each plant as it bloomed throughout the four seasons. He worked on the drawings for 16 years but most of the colored sketches were made 1610-1612. These drawings of living plants not only evoke the beauty of gardens, perfumes, and time-honored herbal remedies but also serve as keys to the way Europeans of the Renaissance conceived of the natural world.
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Besler Hand Colored Engraving

Estimate $2,000 - $4,000
Jul 28, 2018
Starting Price $750
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Arader Galleries

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0042: Besler Hand Colored Engraving

Lot Passed
0 Bids
Est. $2,000 - $4,000Starting Price $750
Arader Galleries Summer Auction
Sat, Jul 28, 2018 1:00 PM EDT
Buyer's Premium 27%

Lot 0042 Details

Description
...
BESLER, Basilius (1561 – 1629). Plate 365. 1. Petasites – Petasites hybridus, Large purple butterbur, bog rhubarb, Devil’s hat, or pestilence wort (Asteraceae or daisy family). Grows throughout most of Europe. Its leaves have been used in traditional Austrian and Czech medicine internally (as tea or cold maceration in ethanol) and externally (as compresses or maceration in vinegar) for treatment of infections, fever, flu, colds, hay-fever and allergies. Preliminary trials have shown a preparation of Butterbur root to be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine attacks.
II.Aeconitum hyemale – Eranthis hyemalis, Winter aconite (Ranunculaceae or buttercup family). Native to woodland habitats in France, Italy, the Balkans, and widely naturalized elsewhere in Europe. Valued in cultivation as one of the earliest of all flowers to appear. ‘Hyemalis’ means winter-flowering in Latin, and ‘er’ + ‘anthos’ in Greek mean spring-flower. All parts of the plant are poisonous when consumed by humans and other mammals, because it contains cardiac glycosides (which stimulate the heart but may cause serious, often irreparable heart damage in large doses). Specific cardiac glycosides present in this species are also found in toad venom.
III.Petasites flore albo – Petasites albus, White butterbur (Asteraceae family). Grows in the mountains, sometimes at altitudes of more than 6,500 feet. First recorded in Sweden in 1737. The small fleshy petioles (leaf stems) are very palatable when cooked and eaten like asparagus. The root is emmenagogue, hypnotic, sedative and vulnerary. The ground or finely chopped rhizome has a healing effect when applied to slow-healing or weak ulcers, or to suppurating wounds. An infusion of the leaves is a specific remedy for coughs.
Copper engraving with hand coloring. Nuremberg: 1613 (1640; 1713).
The first large-folio natural history botanical and the earliest pictorial record of a specific garden, this great florilegium showcases over 1,000 varieties of flowers depicted in 367 engraved and colored plates. The garden of Eichstatt was the first comprehensive botanical garden in Germany devoted to flowering plants, and was founded in 1596. It consisted of eight separate gardens constructed at Willibaldsburg castle for Konrad, bishop-prince of Eichstatt. Each garden was devoted to flowers from a different country. Besler was a Nuremberg apothecary who was called upon for guidance on specimens for the gardens when its first director had died. Besler introduced the idea of documenting the vast garden and depicting each plant as it bloomed throughout the four seasons. He worked on the drawings for 16 years but most of the colored sketches were made 1610-1612. These drawings of living plants not only evoke the beauty of gardens, perfumes, and time-honored herbal remedies but also serve as keys to the way Europeans of the Renaissance conceived of the natural world.

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