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Republican Institution Henry Dearborn Fantastic 26 Item

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Republican Institution Henry Dearborn Fantastic 26 Item
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Description
Dearborn Henry
Republican Institution Henry Dearborn Fantastic 26 Item Archive

HENRY DEARBORN, Archive of 26 documents related to "A Republican Institution in the Town of Boston," 1818-1892. All in very good condition; expected folds; some edge and fold tears with no or minimal effect on text.

This interesting archive of materials relates to A Republican Institution in the Town of Boston. Chartered in February 1819, the Institution's purpose was to promote political thought and discussion. The organizers insisted that it was "absolutely necessary that the Republicans of the Town of Boston should be possessed of some respectable building wherein they may meet together to transact their business, and also a place to receive their Brethren from all parts of the Union." To acquire a building, they agreed to sell four hundred shares in the Institution for $25 each, and one person could purchase only up to four shares.

The Republicans were opposed to the Federalists and originally favored a strict construction of the Constitution and were jealous of the rights of the states. At the time A Republican Institution was founded, their candidate James Monroe was President of the United States, and Republicans had a majority in both houses of Congress. However, in Massachusetts, Federalists had control of state government under Governor John Brooks. In 1824 the Institution began to refund to members the amounts they had paid if they wished to withdraw, and the majority did, greatly reducing the membership. In 1893, A Republican Institution had sixty-three members, one of whom had been a member since 1841, but most of whom had joined in the 1880s or 1890s.

The first president of A Republican Institution was General Henry Dearborn, a veteran of both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, the fifth Secretary of War of the United States from 1801 to 1809, and the Senior Officer of the United States Army from 1812 to 1815. This archive includes two early documents signed by Dearborn as president.

Items and Excerpts:


--P. P. F. Degrand, Manuscript Document Signed, Resolutions, n.d., ca. 1818. 2 pp., 7.375" x 12.25".

"The Committee to whom was referred the subject of a Constitution for the Republican Institution beg leave to Report, that they have given due consideration to the business for which they were appointed, and in their opinion it will require considerable time to accomplish an instrument of so much importance. And as it is necessary to take some immediate measures for the collection of the Instalments, they take the liberty to submit for your consideration the following Resolutions"
[6 resolutions, all accepted.]


--Henry Dearborn, Partially Printed Document Signed, to John S. Perkins, receipt for one installment on one share in the "Republican Institution," February 27, 1819. 1 p., 8.25" x 5".


--Leach Harris, Autograph Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolutions, March 2, 1819. 1 p., 7.5" x 12.5".


--William B. Bradford, Partially Printed Document Signed, to John S. Perkins, receipt for whole installment on one share in the "Republican Institution," September 21, 1821. 1 p., 8.5" x 5".


--Henry Dearborn, Partially Printed document Signed, to Thomas R. Dascomb, Certificate for one share in "A Republican Institution," December 1, 1821. 2 pp., 10" x 8.5". With embossed paper seal and ribbon.


--Joseph Ingersoll, Autograph Document Signed, Audit of Treasurer's Accounts, December 2, 1822. 2 pp., 7" x 9.125".


--William Ingalls, Manuscript Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolutions, 1823. 1 p., 8" x 13".



--Copy of A. Dunlop letter giving legal opinion, October 20, 1823. 2 pp., 7.875" x 12.75".


"I am of opinion that the provision in the 12th article of the Bye Laws is void, and that the only mode in which delinquent subscribers can be compelled to pay Instalments due is by actions against them."


"The usual mode of compelling payments of instalments is by a provision in the Charter of incorporation authorizing the sale of shares and this is clearly good, but in the charter of the Institution there is no such provision. Of course if the Subscribers are bound to pay their Instalments, they are debtors to the Corporation & may be sued."


--Jonathan Simonds, Manuscript Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolutions, 1823-1824. 1 p., 8" x 13.25".


--William B. Bradford, Autograph Document Signed, Receipt to Nathan Fisk, March 11, 1824. 1 p., 3" x 7".


--David Horner and G. S. Fairbanks, Partially Printed Document Signed, to Abel Baker, Power to Proxies, November 18, 1826. 1 p., 6.25" x 14.5". With paper seals.


--Moses Andem, Partially Printed Document Signed, to Warren [Lummoes?], Power to Proxies, November 22, 1826. 1 p., 6.25" x 7.75".


--Jonathan Simonds and J. H. Thayer, Manuscript Document Signed, Report of Audit of Accounts of William B. Bradford, Treasurer, November 12, 1828. 2 pp., 8" x 9.75".

"Your Committee are compelled further to state that the late Treasurer refuses to pay over the funds of the Institution to his Successor in office, unless your committee will allow a compensation for time devoted to paying off those members who withdrew, between the 3d August & 30th Septr 1826, a claim, that your Committee consider, they were not only unauthorized to concede, But conterary likewise to the By-laws of the Institution."

--Receipt for Advertising in the Boston Courier, March 16, 1832. 1 p., 6" x 3.25".

--George Hallet and Prince Hawes, Partially Printed Document Signed, Bond, March 22, 1832. 1 p., 8" x 9.75". With paper seals.

--Ellis Thayer and Andrew Wright, Partially Printed Document Signed, Bond, March 30, 1832. 1 p., 8" x 9.75". With paper seals.

--John K. Simpson and John Rayner, Partially Printed Document Signed, Bond, March 4, 1842. 1 p., 8" x 9.75". With paper seals.

--Isaac Waters and Moses Bass, Manuscript Document Signed, Audit of Treasurer's Accounts, February 10, 1847. 1 p., 10" x 16".

--Receipt for Advertising in the Boston Daily Advertiser, February 16, 1875. 1 p., 8" x 3.375".

--William Parkman, Autograph Document Signed, Report of purchase of ten shares of Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation, September 29, 1891. 2 pp., 8.5" x 10.5".

--Manuscript Document, Resolution on Death of John W. Cumings, March 4, 1892. 2 pp., 8" x 10".

"His long service in the management of our Institution made his relation with its members a very close one and endeared him to all our hearts. In losing him we have lost a wise adviser and a warm friend."


--A. H. Quincy, Manuscript Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolution, n.d. 1 p., 8.375" x 11.75".

--Abstract of payment of shares, n.d. 1 p., 8" x 5.75".

--Manuscript Document, "Abstract return of Original Subscribers No. 2," n.d. 1 p., 11.5" x 8.25".

--"Report of Geo. Blake & James A. Wells" on newspapers, n.d. 1 p., 4.5" x 7.875".

--List of names, n.d. 3 pp., 7.785" x 9.75".

Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) was born in New Hampshire and studied medicine with a doctor in Portsmouth before opening his own practice in Nottingham, New Hampshire in 1772. In 1775, he fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill as a captain in the 1st New Hampshire Infantry. He was captured during the Battle of Quebec at the end of 1775 and was released on parole in May 1776 but not exchanged until March 1777. He fought at Ticonderoga and in the Saratoga campaign. He joined General George Washington's main army at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, as a lieutenant colonel. Dearborn joined Washington's staff in 1781 as deputy quartermaster general and commanded the 1st New Hampshire at the Battle of Yorktown with the rank of colonel. He was discharged from the Continental Army in June 1783 and settled in Maine. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democratic-Republican from the District of Maine (then part of Massachusetts) from 1793 to 1797. In 1801, President Thomas Jefferson appointed Dearborn as Secretary of War, a post he held until March 1809. President James Madison appointed him as collector of the port of Boston, a position Dearborn held from March 1809 to January 1812, when he became the Commanding General of the U.S. Army. After mediocre service in the War of 1812 on the northern frontier with Canada, Dearborn was discharged from the army in June 1815. In 1818, Dearborn ran for Governor of Massachusetts, but his article criticizing Israel Putnam's performance at the Battle of Bunker Hill sparked a long-lasting controversy that harmed his campaign in a largely Federalist state. The Senate rejected Madison's nomination of Dearborn for Secretary of War, and Dearborn served as minister to Portugal from May 1822 to June 1824. He then retired to his home in Massachusetts. Dearborn married three times—to Mary Bartlett in 1771, to Dorcas Marble in 1780, and to Sarah Bowdoin, widow of James Bowdoin, in 1813.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

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Republican Institution Henry Dearborn Fantastic 26 Item

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0098: Republican Institution Henry Dearborn Fantastic 26 Item

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Lot 0098 Details

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Dearborn Henry
Republican Institution Henry Dearborn Fantastic 26 Item Archive

HENRY DEARBORN, Archive of 26 documents related to "A Republican Institution in the Town of Boston," 1818-1892. All in very good condition; expected folds; some edge and fold tears with no or minimal effect on text.

This interesting archive of materials relates to A Republican Institution in the Town of Boston. Chartered in February 1819, the Institution's purpose was to promote political thought and discussion. The organizers insisted that it was "absolutely necessary that the Republicans of the Town of Boston should be possessed of some respectable building wherein they may meet together to transact their business, and also a place to receive their Brethren from all parts of the Union." To acquire a building, they agreed to sell four hundred shares in the Institution for $25 each, and one person could purchase only up to four shares.

The Republicans were opposed to the Federalists and originally favored a strict construction of the Constitution and were jealous of the rights of the states. At the time A Republican Institution was founded, their candidate James Monroe was President of the United States, and Republicans had a majority in both houses of Congress. However, in Massachusetts, Federalists had control of state government under Governor John Brooks. In 1824 the Institution began to refund to members the amounts they had paid if they wished to withdraw, and the majority did, greatly reducing the membership. In 1893, A Republican Institution had sixty-three members, one of whom had been a member since 1841, but most of whom had joined in the 1880s or 1890s.

The first president of A Republican Institution was General Henry Dearborn, a veteran of both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, the fifth Secretary of War of the United States from 1801 to 1809, and the Senior Officer of the United States Army from 1812 to 1815. This archive includes two early documents signed by Dearborn as president.

Items and Excerpts:


--P. P. F. Degrand, Manuscript Document Signed, Resolutions, n.d., ca. 1818. 2 pp., 7.375" x 12.25".

"The Committee to whom was referred the subject of a Constitution for the Republican Institution beg leave to Report, that they have given due consideration to the business for which they were appointed, and in their opinion it will require considerable time to accomplish an instrument of so much importance. And as it is necessary to take some immediate measures for the collection of the Instalments, they take the liberty to submit for your consideration the following Resolutions"
[6 resolutions, all accepted.]


--Henry Dearborn, Partially Printed Document Signed, to John S. Perkins, receipt for one installment on one share in the "Republican Institution," February 27, 1819. 1 p., 8.25" x 5".


--Leach Harris, Autograph Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolutions, March 2, 1819. 1 p., 7.5" x 12.5".


--William B. Bradford, Partially Printed Document Signed, to John S. Perkins, receipt for whole installment on one share in the "Republican Institution," September 21, 1821. 1 p., 8.5" x 5".


--Henry Dearborn, Partially Printed document Signed, to Thomas R. Dascomb, Certificate for one share in "A Republican Institution," December 1, 1821. 2 pp., 10" x 8.5". With embossed paper seal and ribbon.


--Joseph Ingersoll, Autograph Document Signed, Audit of Treasurer's Accounts, December 2, 1822. 2 pp., 7" x 9.125".


--William Ingalls, Manuscript Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolutions, 1823. 1 p., 8" x 13".



--Copy of A. Dunlop letter giving legal opinion, October 20, 1823. 2 pp., 7.875" x 12.75".


"I am of opinion that the provision in the 12th article of the Bye Laws is void, and that the only mode in which delinquent subscribers can be compelled to pay Instalments due is by actions against them."


"The usual mode of compelling payments of instalments is by a provision in the Charter of incorporation authorizing the sale of shares and this is clearly good, but in the charter of the Institution there is no such provision. Of course if the Subscribers are bound to pay their Instalments, they are debtors to the Corporation & may be sued."


--Jonathan Simonds, Manuscript Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolutions, 1823-1824. 1 p., 8" x 13.25".


--William B. Bradford, Autograph Document Signed, Receipt to Nathan Fisk, March 11, 1824. 1 p., 3" x 7".


--David Horner and G. S. Fairbanks, Partially Printed Document Signed, to Abel Baker, Power to Proxies, November 18, 1826. 1 p., 6.25" x 14.5". With paper seals.


--Moses Andem, Partially Printed Document Signed, to Warren [Lummoes?], Power to Proxies, November 22, 1826. 1 p., 6.25" x 7.75".


--Jonathan Simonds and J. H. Thayer, Manuscript Document Signed, Report of Audit of Accounts of William B. Bradford, Treasurer, November 12, 1828. 2 pp., 8" x 9.75".

"Your Committee are compelled further to state that the late Treasurer refuses to pay over the funds of the Institution to his Successor in office, unless your committee will allow a compensation for time devoted to paying off those members who withdrew, between the 3d August & 30th Septr 1826, a claim, that your Committee consider, they were not only unauthorized to concede, But conterary likewise to the By-laws of the Institution."

--Receipt for Advertising in the Boston Courier, March 16, 1832. 1 p., 6" x 3.25".

--George Hallet and Prince Hawes, Partially Printed Document Signed, Bond, March 22, 1832. 1 p., 8" x 9.75". With paper seals.

--Ellis Thayer and Andrew Wright, Partially Printed Document Signed, Bond, March 30, 1832. 1 p., 8" x 9.75". With paper seals.

--John K. Simpson and John Rayner, Partially Printed Document Signed, Bond, March 4, 1842. 1 p., 8" x 9.75". With paper seals.

--Isaac Waters and Moses Bass, Manuscript Document Signed, Audit of Treasurer's Accounts, February 10, 1847. 1 p., 10" x 16".

--Receipt for Advertising in the Boston Daily Advertiser, February 16, 1875. 1 p., 8" x 3.375".

--William Parkman, Autograph Document Signed, Report of purchase of ten shares of Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation, September 29, 1891. 2 pp., 8.5" x 10.5".

--Manuscript Document, Resolution on Death of John W. Cumings, March 4, 1892. 2 pp., 8" x 10".

"His long service in the management of our Institution made his relation with its members a very close one and endeared him to all our hearts. In losing him we have lost a wise adviser and a warm friend."


--A. H. Quincy, Manuscript Document Signed, Report and Proposed Resolution, n.d. 1 p., 8.375" x 11.75".

--Abstract of payment of shares, n.d. 1 p., 8" x 5.75".

--Manuscript Document, "Abstract return of Original Subscribers No. 2," n.d. 1 p., 11.5" x 8.25".

--"Report of Geo. Blake & James A. Wells" on newspapers, n.d. 1 p., 4.5" x 7.875".

--List of names, n.d. 3 pp., 7.785" x 9.75".

Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) was born in New Hampshire and studied medicine with a doctor in Portsmouth before opening his own practice in Nottingham, New Hampshire in 1772. In 1775, he fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill as a captain in the 1st New Hampshire Infantry. He was captured during the Battle of Quebec at the end of 1775 and was released on parole in May 1776 but not exchanged until March 1777. He fought at Ticonderoga and in the Saratoga campaign. He joined General George Washington's main army at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, as a lieutenant colonel. Dearborn joined Washington's staff in 1781 as deputy quartermaster general and commanded the 1st New Hampshire at the Battle of Yorktown with the rank of colonel. He was discharged from the Continental Army in June 1783 and settled in Maine. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democratic-Republican from the District of Maine (then part of Massachusetts) from 1793 to 1797. In 1801, President Thomas Jefferson appointed Dearborn as Secretary of War, a post he held until March 1809. President James Madison appointed him as collector of the port of Boston, a position Dearborn held from March 1809 to January 1812, when he became the Commanding General of the U.S. Army. After mediocre service in the War of 1812 on the northern frontier with Canada, Dearborn was discharged from the army in June 1815. In 1818, Dearborn ran for Governor of Massachusetts, but his article criticizing Israel Putnam's performance at the Battle of Bunker Hill sparked a long-lasting controversy that harmed his campaign in a largely Federalist state. The Senate rejected Madison's nomination of Dearborn for Secretary of War, and Dearborn served as minister to Portugal from May 1822 to June 1824. He then retired to his home in Massachusetts. Dearborn married three times—to Mary Bartlett in 1771, to Dorcas Marble in 1780, and to Sarah Bowdoin, widow of James Bowdoin, in 1813.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE.

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